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Dollhouse Project 2017

I have decided to forgo building another dollhouse kit and elected to build one from plans that I will modify. I downloaded a couple of plans off the internet from The Woodcrafter Page and with the wood I have in stock I hope to build this three story house. The Victorian Dollhouse plans were free and the other is for a Moorestown Victorian house that I purchased. I believe the plans I downloaded are based on actual houses. The shell design was modified from the Victorian plans by making the rooms larger and adding more windows. I also added a door on the right annex to provide access to a wraparound porch from inside the house. This will be a bedroom but not the master bedroom as that will be bigger and placed upstairs on the second level. Below are the tools I will be using to cut and assemble the dollhouse.

Rockwell Bladerunner Hand Tools Dremel Workstations
Rockwell Bladerunner Various Hand Tools Dremel Workstations

Foundation

I start off by building a foundation in which to attach the walls. I am using a 1/2x3/4 inch strip to build the frame and covering that with 3/8 inch plywood. The plywood was a veneer that I had outside in the garage that sustained considerable water damage but that I was able to salvage for use as the floor. Figure 1 shows the piece I cut out for the floor and Figure 2 shows the underside of the frame with the floor glued on.

Foundation
Fig 1 <=Click photos for larger picture=> Fig 2
Rabbet Joint

My table saw only handles cuts at 6 inches wide using the guide so I had to cut my 10 inch wide walls from two pieces at 4 and 6 inches wide. I then set up my Dremel router table to router a rabbet joint. I have owned this router table for over ten years and I probably only used it at most six times. You attach a Dremel tool to the underside with a router tip at the desired depth as shown in figure 3. Like any other router table you set your guide to the width of the joint you need and feed the wood over the router bit as in figure 4.

Rabbet Joint
Fig 3 <=Click photos for larger picture=> Fig 4
Rabbet Joint

I then sanded the rabbet joint shown in figure 5. The joint was routered on one edge of the two pieces and them placed side by side with one joint facing up the other facing down forming a lap joint. Gluing these two pieces together (figure 6) gave me the ten inch walls I needed.

Rabbet Joint
Fig 5 <=Click photos for larger picture=> Fig 6
Walls

After I marked out my windows and doors I drilled a pilot hole inside the guide lines as shown in figure 7. This hole allowed me to place the wall over the scroll saw blade on my table saw. I made a cut clockwise around the window until I reached a corner. I then backed the blade up and cut a curve to the next line as can be seen in figure 8. I made this cut until I could lift the scrap piece out and cut away the corners by cutting in a counter-clockwise direction.

Walls
Fig 7 <=Click photos for larger picture=> Fig 8
Walls Walls
Fig 9 <=Click photos for larger picture=> Fig 10
Walls

I decided to use a rabbet joint on the corners instead of a butt joint. I only did this out of personal preference rather than any structural concerns. I scribbled this on the plans shown in figure 11 as a guide for when I routered the walls. Figure 12 is the section marked B on the left side of the plans as shown in figure 11.

Walls
Fig 11 <=Click photos for larger picture=> Fig 12
Walls

In keeping with the scale of 1/12 (1 inch equals 1 foot), standard interior walls are around 5 inches thick so I decided on making my interior walls 3/8 inches. Because I used 3/16 inch thick plywood for the interior walls that only adds up to a scale of approximately 2 1/4 inches. If 1/2 inch equals 6 inches then 1/4 inch equals 3 inches and 1/8 inch equals 1 1/2 inch. Therefore 3/8 inch is equal to 4 1/2 inches. I needed to add another 3/16 inch to the walls. I used 1/8 inch strips glued to the wall and covered that with a sheet of 1/16 thick basswood. This will also give me space within the walls to run my electrical wires. The exterior walls will be 1/2 inch thick.

Walls
Fig 13 <=Click photos for larger picture=> Fig 14
Video

Here are two videos showcasing the power tools I am using. The Dremel Router Table is an attachment for the Dremel Rotary tool. The Rockwell BladeRunner is a multi-cut table saw that uses jig-saw blades. The saw uses 4" t-shank jigsaw blades to provide rip, cross and scroll cuts. Click on the pictures to the right or left to view the short clips.

Video
Fig 15 <=Click photos for videos=> Fig 16
Walls

TEXT HERE

Walls
Fig 00 <=Click photos for larger picture=> Fig 00


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This page was last updated on June 21, 2017